Mach' mit bei der ASB-Bundesliga-Tippliga zur Saison 2019/20! Einfach mit dem ASB-Usernamen bei TIPPETY anmelden und lostippen. Alle weiteren Infos hier!

Jump to content
Gampern

Financial Fair Play

284 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Michel Platini's victory for stability spells end to freewheeling culture

Uefa has won its battle to make clubs indebted to wealthy owners prove they can live within their means

At Uefa's pine and glass headquarters on the banks of Lake Geneva tomorrow, European football's governing body will enshrine a rule designed to wrestle football's financial frenzy into some saner shape. The product of almost three years work since Uefa's president, Michel Platini, expressed alarm at the "danger to football" of debt, overspending and "rampant commercialism", Uefa's executive committee will approve the "financial fair play" regulations.

Its principle, after so many years of the football public here being told there is no alternative to the game being a toy of the free market, is heartbreakingly simple. From 2012-13, just two years' time, clubs who wish to play in European competitions must not spend more than they earn. That, in a nutshell, is it.

The idea is to stop clubs spending on players' wages beyond their income to chase the dream of success – and not only here, where according to the most recent, 2008-09 accounts, 14 of the 20 Premier League clubs made substantial losses. In Spain, La Liga clubs have recently posted €3bn annual debts, and Italy's top clubs, one of which, Juventus, was graced by Platini himself in the 1980s, have long been addicted to financial fixes from owners.

From 2012-13 massive spending on players by owners, as at Chelsea, where Roman Abramovich has paid in £726m since 2003, or Manchester City, whose owner Sheikh Mansour, has spent £400m since 2008, will be prohibited. An individual club must pay their players and other costs out of the money they earn, from TV, sponsorships – and, here, the world's highest ticket prices – not from "benefactor" owners.

According to Platini, the owners themselves, including Abramovich, Silvio Berlusconi of Milan and Massimo Moratti at the newly crowned European champions Internazionale, asked him to introduce regulations, so that they themselves are not endlessly drawn into subsidising their clubs. The rule does not outlaw debt in itself, but heavily indebted clubs, such as Manchester United and Liverpool here, must ensure they can meet their heavy interest payments, not be drawn into losses.

If clubs fail to meet the break-even requirement, Uefa will not ban them immediately from European competition, but refer them to its disciplinary committee, to determine the most appropriate sanction. The clear signal is that clubs must break even, and it is certain to be adopted not only by those few clubs which actually qualify for Europe, but by all top clubs aspiring to it.

There is a little more detail to the regulations; after consulting with Europe's clubs and leagues, and working with the Manchester-based sports business group at consultants Deloitte, Uefa built some subtlety in. Club owners will still be able to invest as much as they want into solid infrastructure – training grounds, youth development or stadiums but not to pay players – as long as they put the money into the club directly, in return for shares (equity), rather than lending it.

The initiative will be phased in, weaning the clubs slowly off relying on owners. Between 2012-13 and 2015-16, club owners will still be allowed to subsidise total losses of €45m (£38m), effectively €15m a year, if they put the money in as equity. After that, in the three years between 2016-17 and 2019-20, the figure must come down to €30m. From then, the total will come down further, to zero eventually, Uefa hopes.

Announcing that the rules, with these compromises, had been agreed with the clubs and leagues, Platini told Uefa's congress in March: "I told you it was vital for football and the future of our clubs that they should respect clear rules on the management of their finances. I told you we will act because it is a question of ethics, a question of credibility and even a question of survival for our sport."

Ratification of the rule tomorrow will conclude a remarkable journey for an idea, developed from Platini's something-must-be-done cri de coeur to detailed regulations requiring most clubs to change completely their freewheeling behaviour. The Premier League fought for owners still to be allowed to subsidise players wages, but was overruled and will fall into line. Since the global financial crisis bit and Portsmouth's hideous £122.8m insolvency, several of the league's own clubs have recognised they must try to rein in overspending, and the league has introduced its own measures aimed at better financial regulation. Rather than rail against Uefa, the Premier League will seek to help its clubs try to break even.

"The vast majority of what is being proposed is common sense and has already, or is about to be, incorporated into Premier League rules," a spokesman said. "If the regulations are introduced as reported, we envisage a difficult period of adjustment for our member clubs who play or aspire to play in European competition."

That acceptance represents a journey, too, for Richard Scudamore, the Premier League's chief executive, who in September 2007 dismissed Platini's complaints about "rampant commercialism" as "not much above the view of people in the corner of the pub".

Platini laughed then, stressing how comfortable he is talking to fans in a pub. The Uefa president, a former playing great and France national coach, learned much about football's significance in a bar in Joeuf, the mining town of his birth, where his father organised the local club from which his son embarked on a meteoric career. For Platini, the heart of the game remains the one he absorbed in that smoky French bar.

Uefa's achievement is to have translated its president's gut instinct into a workable rule. The genesis of "financial fair play" followed a visit to the US in February 2008 by three Uefa executives, Andrea Traverso, now head of club licensing, Gianni Infantino, the current general secretary, and William Gaillard, Platini's special adviser. They examined the NFL, NBA, Major League Soccer and other US sports, to understand how rules including salary-capping have kept clubs roughly equal and financially healthy, and the competitions so commercially successful.

They concluded that salary caps would be difficult to introduce here due to European free market rules, but financial stability was a vital step towards a healthier game. Once clubs are living within their means, Uefa and the national competitions can look at how to share money more evenly, so that the richest clubs' dominance is not further entrenched.

Until then, although every Platini utterance has been painted by some as anti-Premier League rhetoric, the English top flight should have an advantage, because it makes the most money, from expensive Sky TV subscriptions and match tickets, and the newly minted £1.2bn three-year overseas TV deals.

Platini and his team have shown true leadership, cutting through the flannel that nothing can be done, achieving Europe-wide agreement for an actual rule to help restore football to balance. The rule's introduction will reinforce powerfully here the howling need for a strong, independent-minded Football Association to be a governing body, rather than, since the exits of Lord Triesman and Ian Watmore, the sad vacuum we currently have.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/blog/2010/may/26/michel-platini-uefa-club-finances

Wird jetzt offenbar wirklich Ernst gemacht, man mag es gar nicht glauben. Ein Selbstreinigungsprozeß, sprich dass es einzelne Klubs einfach zerreißt, wie ich vor ein paar Jahren gehofft hatte, ist natürlich vollkommen utopisch, aber können neue Regularien wirklich der Wettbewerbsverzerrung Einhalt gebieten? Ich frage mich, welche Schlupflöcher die Vereine dann wieder finden werden durch die sie sich durchwinden können.

Wird sich etwas an der Rangordnung ändern? In erster Linie denke ich da an gewisse italienische Vereine. Wird dann z.B. Saras einen, Hausnummer, €200 Mio. Sponsordeal mit Internazionale abschließen? (nur als Beispiel, k.A. ob es Moratti möglich wäre, sowas durchzudrücken, ist ja nicht alleiniger Eigentümer)

Grossartig finde ich auch, dass z.B. im SID-Artikel im Online Standard Manchester United und Liverpool erwähnt werden. Manche haben wohl immer noch nicht kapiert, wie es bei diesen beiden Vereinen aussieht. :facepalm:

There will be some leeway granted for the six years after 2012 but some Premier League clubs, notably Manchester City, Chelsea and Aston Villa, could still fall foul of the rule unless they change their spending habits.

Manchester United have carried out a 'dummy test' and believe they would pass the rules despite the handicap of paying out £45m to service their debts every year. Arsenal and Tottenham would pass the test comfortably, while Liverpool, Celtic and Rangers would probably do so.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/2010/may/27/uefa-michel-platini-club-financial-regulations

Noch was: Three-quarters of Premier League must make cuts to meet new Uefa rules

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

naja, ist eben immer alles relativ.. die deutschen klubs, welche immer als paradabeispiel genannt werden, sind ja eigentlich auch nicht besser - die lagern eben alle schulden in ihre stadion gmbhs aus :ratlos:

das ganze hört sich jetzt sicher dramatischer an, als es wird.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

die deutschen klubs

Welche genau?

Wissen tu ich's nur bei Bayern, die haben das Stadion auch gekauft. Insofern erscheint mir der Begriff "auslagern" etwas unpassend.

die lagern eben alle schulden in ihre stadion gmbhs aus

Und wenn's so ist? Das wird in jeder mir bekannten Berechnungsweise auch zu den Schulden des Vereins dazugezählt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im Endeffekt heisst das ja nix anderes als dass sich jetzt die Konzerne die Vereine gekauft haben und die Milliadäre die einen Fußballverein als Spielzeug sehen von der Entwicklung profitieren, weil die sich einfach selbst als Sponsor einsetzen können und so immer auf Break Even kommen und da die Konkurrenz mehr aufs Geld schauen muss wirds wohl auch noch ziemlich einfach. Großartige Entwicklung würd ich sagen. Aber bitte, bloß keine Gehaltsobergrenze angreifen, es könnt sich ja wer weh tun und die CL wär aufeinmal spannend... :facepalm:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Schalke ist das Paradebeispiel.

menasche hat "die deutschen klubs" geschrieben. Da reicht mir Schalke allein als Beispiel nicht.

Und ich würd immer noch gern wissen, ob die Schulden von Tochterunternehmen auch zu den Vereinsschulden gerechnet werden. Wenns, wie ich glaube, so ist, dann is es nämlich völlig wurscht...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im Endeffekt heisst das ja nix anderes als dass sich jetzt die Konzerne die Vereine gekauft haben und die Milliadäre die einen Fußballverein als Spielzeug sehen von der Entwicklung profitieren, weil die sich einfach selbst als Sponsor einsetzen können und so immer auf Break Even kommen und da die Konkurrenz mehr aufs Geld schauen muss wirds wohl auch noch ziemlich einfach. Großartige Entwicklung würd ich sagen. Aber bitte, bloß keine Gehaltsobergrenze angreifen, es könnt sich ja wer weh tun und die CL wär aufeinmal spannend... :facepalm:

Wo für Abramowtisch, Berlusconi etc. der Vorteil sein soll, über den Umweg Sponsoring Kohle in den Verein zu pumpen anstatt direkt, kapier ich nicht. Dazu kommt, dass die Kohle vom vorigen Sponsor (samsung, bwin) wegfällt, wenn man's so macht. Das dürfte auch nicht grad wenig sein. Deine Theorie scheint mir etwas unlogisch.

Die neuen Regeln sind sicher nicht perfekt, aber ein enormer Fortschritt. Europaweite Gehaltsobergrenzen sind meines Wissens (leider) rechtlich nicht möglich.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

menasche hat "die deutschen klubs" geschrieben. Da reicht mir Schalke allein als Beispiel nicht.

Und ich würd immer noch gern wissen, ob die Schulden von Tochterunternehmen auch zu den Vereinsschulden gerechnet werden. Wenns, wie ich glaube, so ist, dann is es nämlich völlig wurscht...

schalke, BVB, Köln, Hertha, Bielefeld.. wobei das nur die "akuteren" problemfälle sind.

außerdem geht es darum, dass es in GER grundsätzlich möglich ist, weitere tochtergesellschaften zu gründen und die schulden zu "verschieben", um so in der lizenzierung besser bewertet zu werden (bsp: BVB lt. lizenz ca. 70 mio - mit allen tochtergesellschaften sinds ca. 250 Mio !!) -> so werden wohl alle vereine ihre bilanze aufpolieren, denke ich.

Edited by menasche

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fussballvereine werden international wie große Firmen gehandelt. Jahr für Jahr einen Gewinn zu machen ist ja sinnlos. Das Geld muss sich bewegen und leben, sonst bringt es ja nix ein.

Verlagern von Geld, sowohl Aktiva als auch Passiva, ist das normalste der Welt. Habe noch bei keiner Firma gearbeitet, die nicht eine Hypothek auf das Firmengrundstück hatte. Jede Immobilie die man günstig kriegt, wird gekauft und bei Zeiten wieder verkauft. In der Zwischenzeit wird eine überhöhte Hypothek draufgenommen, damit man wieder was zum arbeiten hat.

Die Firma, bei der ich zur Zeit arbeite, hatte schon 2 Tocherfirmen, die auch im Ausgleich waren. Zur Zeit macht die Firma einen Mörderumsatz und wir müssen sehen, wo wir die Kohle unterbringen.

Genau das gleiche macht ManU, Bayern, BVB und wie sie sonst noch alle heissen. Sollte man es wirklich schaffen, diese Millionenschwerden Unternehmen so gut zu kontrollieren und solche Regeln einzuschleissen, dass diese Firmen keine Tochtergesellschaften und keine überhöhten Hypotheken auf die Gebäude aufnehmen, bräuchte man es nur 1:1 umsetzen und die Weltwirtschaft wäre damit gerettet.

Es gibt immer Schlupflöcher nur schaut da jahrelang keiner nach. Und solange man "gut" steht mit gewissen Leuten, kommt auch keiner schauen. Lizenzverfahren in Deutschland ist eine Farce, so wie es auch bei uns nicht ernstzunehmen war. Sturm bekommt die Lizenz und 3 Monate später sind sie wissentlich schon seit Monaten Zahlungsunfähig. Das ist Business! Mit solchen Aktionen hat man in der Vergangenheit nur den kleinen geschadet. Ob das die Fussballwelt fairer macht wage ich zu bezweifeln.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wo für Abramowtisch, Berlusconi etc. der Vorteil sein soll, über den Umweg Sponsoring Kohle in den Verein zu pumpen anstatt direkt, kapier ich nicht. Dazu kommt, dass die Kohle vom vorigen Sponsor (samsung, bwin) wegfällt, wenn man's so macht. Das dürfte auch nicht grad wenig sein. Deine Theorie scheint mir etwas unlogisch.

Die neuen Regeln sind sicher nicht perfekt, aber ein enormer Fortschritt. Europaweite Gehaltsobergrenzen sind meines Wissens (leider) rechtlich nicht möglich.

Wieso sollte das Geld vom vorherigen Sponsor wegfallen? Man muss ja nicht als Hauptsponsor auftreten. Der Vorteil is ja, dass die entsprechenden Vereine über ungleich mehr Geld verfügen als die normalen Fußballklubs und so über die Kohle einfach den Erfolg kaufen können.

Und rechtlich nicht möglich halt ich für eine billige Ausrede, wenn ich als Verband solche Regeln festlege dann kann man sie entweder einhalten oder eben nicht mehr im Verband mitspielen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Und rechtlich nicht möglich halt ich für eine billige Ausrede, wenn ich als Verband solche Regeln festlege dann kann man sie entweder einhalten oder eben nicht mehr im Verband mitspielen.

so ein blödsinn... auch ein fussballverband wird nicht gegen europäisches recht verstossen können. kannst aber gerne deine anregung in sachen bosman urteil abgeben. war anscheinend auch nur eine billige ausrede.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Naja so wirklich echte Schulden hat Manu ja net.

Manu ist noch lange net höher in der Kreide, als wie der Verein+diverse Immos usw wert ist.

46 Prozent des Werts ist (für mich) nicht grade wenig.

schalke, BVB, Köln, Hertha, Bielefeld.. wobei das nur die "akuteren" problemfälle sind.

außerdem geht es darum, dass es in GER grundsätzlich möglich ist, weitere tochtergesellschaften zu gründen und die schulden zu "verschieben", um so in der lizenzierung besser bewertet zu werden (bsp: BVB lt. lizenz ca. 70 mio - mit allen tochtergesellschaften sinds ca. 250 Mio !!) -> so werden wohl alle vereine ihre bilanze aufpolieren, denke ich.

Interessant. Woher hast du die ganzen Infos?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Folge uns auf Facebook

  • Partnerlinks

  • Unsere Sponsoren und Partnerseiten

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...